A think piece on intergenerational equity

A think piece on intergenerational equity
Document type
Report
Author(s)
Piachaud, David; Macnicol, John; Lewis, Jane
Publisher
Equality & Human Rights Commission
Date of publication
1 September 2009
Subject(s)
People management: all aspects of managing people
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

This item is only available to registered users

Register now or Log in

Your use of this content is subject to the terms and conditions of this portal

The report sets out different concepts of intergenerational equity (IGE) that have been used, reviews the historical uses of these concepts, examines intergenerational relationships at the level of the household and the relation between paid and unpaid work, discusses issues that arise in thinking about IGE and finally draws conclusions for the work of the Commission and Age Concern and Help the Aged.

Related to People management: all aspects of managing people

From rights to reality: enforcing labour market laws in the UK

Downloadable spotlight looking at violations of labour market rights

Good Work Plan: consultation on measures to address one-sided flexibility

Downloadable report on measures to address one-sided flexibility

Equality and discrimination: understand the basics

Downloadable guide outlining how to comply with equality legislation

More items related to this subject

Related to Equality & Human Rights Commission

Decision time: will the voluntary sector embrace the age of opportunity?

The culmination of 18 months of research and events, this report highlights that the voluntary sector is currently not ready for our ageing society and needs to adapt to grasp the opportunities this

A better offer: the future of volunteering in an ageing society

Our ageing society is likely to have a profound effect on UK charities. The loyal band of retirees on whom so many charities rely as volunteers—a group in the past called ‘the reserve army of little

Supporting older carers: examining reasons for the low level of uptake of carers assessments by older carers in Northern Ireland

This report shows that many older carers in Northern Ireland are not receiving the information and support they are entitled to because not enough is being done to promote awareness of their right to

More items related to this publisher