Exploring Eastern Silk Roads: A Journey Through the Collection at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

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Camel, approx. 690-750. China; Shaanxi or Henan province, Tang dynasty (618-907). Earthenware with glaze. Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, The Avery Brundage Collection, B60S95. Photograph © Asian Art Museum of San Francisco.
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Part of the Georgetown-IDP Lecture Series: Following the Silk Roads to North America

This is an online event hosted on Zoom. Bookers are sent a link in advance giving access.

Many artworks from Dunhuang and other Silk Road sites have entered museum collections in the US. By focusing on ten objects at the AAM, this talk details the spread of Buddhist art and discusses rich religious and cultural activities in the eastern portion of the Silk Roads from the Han to the Yuan dynasty. By mapping their origins in chronological order, we can better understand these artworks from sites such as the Mogao Caves in Dunhuang and Simsim Caves in Kucha. Explore how artistic exchanges and cultural interactions provided endless inspiration for the development of Chinese art in the past two millenniums.

Dr Fan Jeremy Zhang is the Barbara and Gerson Bakar curator of Chinese art and head of the Chinese department at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. He holds a PhD from Brown University and an MA from Vanderbilt University, both in the History of Art. He was trained as an archaeologist at Kublai Khan's Xanadu in Inner Mongolia. He previously served as the Asian Art curator at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art and the Smith College Museum of Art and held research positions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Field Museum.

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Details

Name: Exploring Eastern Silk Roads: A Journey Through the Collection at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco
Where: British Library St Pancras
When: -
Enquiries: +44 (0)1937 546546
boxoffice@bl.uk
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