Catherine Hall

Catherine Hall

Biography

Catherine Hall is an historian known for her work on gender, class and empire in the 19th century, particularly her pioneering Family fortunes: men and women of the English middle class, 1780-1850 (new edn. London: Routledge, 2002) which she published with Leonore Davidoff in 1987 and Civilising Subjects; metropole and colony in the English imagination 1830-1867 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002), one of the first substantive feminist histories to take up questions of race as central to the formation of modern Britain, a work influenced by black feminism. She was active in Birmingham women's liberation and attended the first national women's liberation conference at Ruskin. From 1981-1997 she was a member of the Feminist Review Collective.

Listen to Catherine Hall discussing a Birmingham-based consciousness-raising group and collective childcare.

More information about Catherine Hall's interview, including how to access the full sound recording.

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