Deirdre Beddoe

Deirdre Beddoe

Biography

Deirdre Beddoe (born 1942) is Emeritus Professor of Women’s History at the University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, and has written extensively on the history of women in Britain in general and in Wales in particular. She has been involved in Women’s Studies for many years. She was a member of Cardiff Women’s Action Group in the 1970s, when the group met at the Old Arcade and later at the Friends’ Meeting House in Charles Street. She regards that experience as truly liberating and life changing. She is President of Archif Menywod Cymru / The Women’s Archive of Wales, an organisation that seeks to promote Welsh Women’s History and to rescue the sources of women’s lives in Wales.

Listen to Deirdre Beddoe discussing wanting to be a sailor, and organising the first Welsh Women's History Conference.

More information about Deirdre Beddoe's interview, including how to access the full sound recording.

Related articles

Girls in formal education

Article by:
Sisterhood and After Research Team
Theme:
Education

The Women’s Liberation Movement has to be seen in the context of the educational system in which its members grew up. Learn more about the tripartite system, the 11+ exam and its mixed consequences - a divisive, class-based system, but one that gave opportunities for some girls to access grammar schools.

Education and the Women's Liberation Movement

Article by:
Sisterhood and After Research Team
Theme:
Education

How did the Women’s Liberation Movement help transform education and the place of women in academia? Find out about compulsory, further and higher education for girls and women, as well as sex education provision in the 1970s and the development of Women’s Studies courses at universities.

Women’s studies and women’s history

Article by:
Sisterhood and After Research Team
Theme:
Education

Women’s Studies as a subject allowed feminists to discuss and develop their ideas and theoretical arguments and it started to become accepted within academia. But as the subject grew, some feminists felt that the gap between theory and practice had become too wide.