Rosalind Delmar

Rosalind Delmar

Biography

Rosalind Delmar became aware of the complex cultural dynamic of class and sex as a working class girl at a convent grammar school in the 1950s. She attended the first women's liberation conference in 1970 and was a member of the London Women's Liberation Workshop and its office collective. The Workshop’s study groups stimulated new critiques of the family, history, and sexual difference, which she developed further by teaching women's studies. A member of the Virago Advisory group, the 7 Days editorial collective and the Red Rag Collective, she contributed papers and articles to a variety of conferences and journals. She also translated Italian feminist texts, including Sibilla Aleramo’s Una Donna (A Woman) Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1979). Since then she has maintained a scholarly interest in the diverse history of feminisms and of women’s ideas, and contributes in this area to the Women's Review of Books.

Listen to Rosalind Delmar discussing the WLM sixth demand, and CND.

More information about Rosalind Delmar's interview, including how to access the full sound recording.

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