Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë’s (1818-1848) only novel, published in 1847. Blending realism, romance and the Gothic, some reviewers thought it immoral and abhorrent; others praised its originality and ‘rugged power’. The house at the Heights is situated in bleak moorland, and the wild setting is a powerful presence as the story unfolds. This text has multiple narrative viewpoints. The main perspectives come from Lockwood, a southerner who finds Yorkshire an alien place; and a servant, Nelly Dean, who moves between the Heights and Brontë’s contrasting location of Thrushcross Grange. Heathcliff is a dark, enigmatic, brooding ‘Byronic hero’, a character type familiar to contemporary readers. 

Related articles

Melding fantasy and realism in Wuthering Heights

Article by:
John Bowen
Theme:
The novel 1832–1880

Professor John Bowen explores the intertwined nature of fantasy and realism within Emily Brontë’s novel.

Who is Heathcliff?

Article by:
John Bowen
Theme:
The novel 1832–1880

Professor John Bowen considers the enigmatic outsider of Wuthering Heights.

Walking the landscape of Wuthering Heights

Article by:
John Bowen
Theme:
The novel 1832–1880

Situating Emily Brontë in her hometown of Haworth – a small Yorkshire mill town surrounded by moors – Professor John Bowen reflects on the representation of landscape in Wuthering Heights.

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Bronte’s Wuthering Heights: Fantasy and Realism

Bronte’s Wuthering Heights: Fantasy and Realism

The genres of fantasy and realism in Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights.

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Bronte’s Wuthering Heights: Walking the Landscape

Bronte’s Wuthering Heights: Walking the Landscape

The contexts of place and landscape for studying Wuthering Heights.

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Bronte’s Wuthering Heights: Who is Heathcliff?

Bronte’s Wuthering Heights: Who is Heathcliff?

Perspectives on the character of Heathcliff in Bronte's Wuthering Heights.

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