Black-Fryers

Description

This is the title page for Richard Hord's Black-Fryers (1625) depicting the collapse of part of the former monastery complex in 1623, which killed nearly 100 people who had gathered to hear a sermon. Except for a glimpse of the rooftops in Hollar's 1644 view of London, this is the only surviving contemporary depiction of part of the Blackfriars precinct.

Full title:
Black Fryers. (Elegia de admiranda clade centum Papistarum tempore concionis vespertinæ habitæ Londini. Anno 1623.).
Published:
1625
Format:
Book / Illustration / Image
Language:
English
Creator:
Richard Hord
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
C.123.d.1

Full catalogue details

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