Astrological charts by Ted Hughes

Description

This triplicate notebook contains a large number of astrological charts created by Ted Hughes for different individuals and significant dates. Shown here are charts for the psychoanalyist Sigmund Freud, the poets W B Yeats, T S Eliot and Sylvia Plath (the latter relating to the publication of Plath's first collection of poetry, The Colossus and other poems), and the announcement of Hughes’s Poet Laureateship. The charts are undated.

The notebook, which also contains an unpublished poem by Sylvia Plath about Christmas, was stored by Hughes in his workroom and work hut at his home in North Tawton, Devon.

Full title:
Edward James Hughes Papers: Notes and drafts from workroom and workhut. This folder includes a Tudor triplicate notebook containing a large number of astrological charts created by Hughes for different individuals and significant dates.
Created:
undated; whole volume 15 October 1951–98
Format:
Manuscript / Notebook
Creator:
Ted Hughes
Usage terms

© The Ted Hughes Estate. No copying, republication or modification is allowed for material © The Ted Hughes Estate. For further use of this material please seek formal permission from the copyright holder.

Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
Add MS 88918/12/8

Full catalogue details

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