Famous Five books by Enid Blyton: manuscript notes and typescript drafts

Description

The Famous Five are perhaps the best-loved of all Enid Blyton's characters. Siblings Julian, Dick and Anne, their tomboy cousin ’George’ (Georgina) and Timmy the dog make up the Five. The cousins get together every school holiday and, before they know it, stumble upon a new adventure.

Here you can see pages from Enid Blyton’s original drafts for Five Go to the Mystery Moor and Five Have a Wonderful Time.

What’s the appeal of the Famous Five?

The series began with Five on a Treasure Island, published in 1942. It was such a smash-hit that Enid Blyton went on to write another 20 books about the mystery-solving gang. It was her longest-running series of novels, but the Five themselves never aged. What made them so popular?

There was always a page-turning adventure, usually involving treasure, caves or secret passageways. The plucky children had to use their wits to catch the villains, defend their island and get home safely for tea. They had binoculars and torches, but no mobile phones!

The Famous Five are made up of strong, developed characters, who are all in their own ways courageous and determined. The Five are also famous for enjoying lots of delicious picnic teas, which must have tantalised readers in wartime and post-war Britain.

More than anything the children have absolute freedom – the essential ingredient in any decent adventure! Can you imagine the fun you’d have if the grown-ups weren’t always in charge?

Who was Enid Blyton?

Enid Blyton was the first children's writer to become a household name. She wrote more than 700 books – so many that nobody knows the exact number. Her work has been translated into more than 40 languages, and her trademark signature is instantly recognisable.

How did she do it? Enid Blyton wrote quickly! In the covering note to the original typescript for Five Go to the Mystery Moor, she says 'I do not write my books by hand, but type them straight out of my head'. This is how she he could produce a full-length novel in a week.

Changing times

Enid Blyton's work has caused controversy. It has been criticised for its depiction of gender, class, national and racial stereotypes.

With the help of her family, many of Blyton's books have been updated, so that young readers can continue to enjoy the stories.

The word 'gypsies' is used in the typescript of Five Go the Mystery Moor. In the current edition of the book, this has been replaced by the word ‘travellers’.


Label by British Library Learning in partnership with Seven Stories.

Transcript

_______________

THIS IS THE ORIGINAL
TYPESCRIPT OF

FIVE GO TO MYSTERY Moor

which is the 13th and latest of the
“Famous Five” books.

_______________

I do not write my books by hand,
but type them straight out of my head.
You will see the corrections
I have made before sending the
book to the publisher.


EB/01/01/01/02

THIS IS THE ORIGINAL TYPESCRIPT OF

“F I V E      G O      T O       M Y S T E R Y        M O O R”

WHICH IS THE 13th AND LATEST OF THE
“FAMOUS FIVE” BOOKS.

____________

I DO NOT WRITE MY BOOKS BY HAND, BUT
TYPE THEM STRAIGHT OUT OF MY HEAD.
YOU WILL SEE THE CORRECTIONS I HAVE MADE
BEFORE SENDING THE BOOK TO THE PUBLISHER.


Foreword.

Dear Children, (especially Famous five Club Members,)
This is the thirteenth adventure that the Famous
Five had had. The same characters appear in it – Julian,
Dick, George, Anne – and Timmy the dog, and it is, of
course, quite complete in itself.

First I meant to write six of these Famous Five
books for you. But when I came to six, you said “No –
you must go on!” So I said I would do another six and
make it twelve. But when I had finished the twelfth
in came thousands of letters again, “But you CAN’T stop
at twelve. Please go on forever!2” So here is the
thirteenth for you, and I hope you will like it as much
as you like the others.

The names of the other books are -:

FIVE ON A TREASURE ISLAND
FIVE GO ADVENTURING AGAIN
FIVE RUN AWAY TOGETHER
FIVE GO TO SMUGGLER’S TOP
GIVE GO OFF IN A CARAVAN
FIVE ON KIRRIN ISLAND AGAIN
FIVE GO OFF TO CAMP
FIVE GET INTO TROUBLE
FIVE FALL INTO ADVENTURE
FIVE ON A HIKE TOGETHER
FIVE HAVE A WONDERFUL TIME
FIVE GO DOWN TO THE SEA

One more thing. The lovers of the Famous Five
books have formed a club, called the Famous Five Club.
For particulars of this, see the page at the end of
the book.
My love to you all
From
Enid Blyton
2


FIVE       HAVE        A
       WONDERFUL
      TIME
by
ENID BLYTON

Illustrated by Eileen Soper

 

London HODDER & STOUGHTON Limited


FIVE HAVE A WONDERFUL TIME

by } 12
ENID BLYTON }

Illustrated by Eileen Soper 10

Hodder and Stoughton
London 12


Foreword.
This is the eleventh book about the Famous
Five. You will find Julian, Dick, George, Anne, and Tim-
my the dog hhere, of course, as in all the other Famous
Five books.
169/10
Although this is the eleventh of the ser-
ies it is quite complete in itself. The others are –

FIVE ON A TREASURE ISLAND 1. Five on a Treasure Island.
FIVE GO ADVENTURING AGAIN 2. etc.
FIVE RUN AWAY TOGETHER 3. etc.
FIVE GO TO SMUGGLER’S TOP 4. etc.
FIVE GO OFF IN A CARAVAN 5. . Please list books
FIVE ON KIRRIN ISLAND AGAIN 6. . in right order
FIVE GO OFF TO CAMP 7. .
FIVE GET INTO TROUBLE 8. .
FIVE FALL INTO ADVENTURE 9. .
FIVE ON A HIKE TOGETHER 10. .
11.
12. I hope you will like this one just
as much as you have liked the others.
Good luck to you all from
ENID BLYTON


Five Have a Wonderful Time. d.c.

Contents.

I. George is All Alone.
2. All Together Again.
3. A Pleasant Morning.
4. The AFair-Folk Arrive.
5. Night ancd Morning.
6. Unfriendly Folk.
7. A Letter – a Walk – and a Shock.
8. Where are the Caravans?
9. A Great Surprise
10. Back with the Fair-Folk Again.
11. A Very Strange Thing.
169-11 12. Fire-eating and FOther Things.
13. Off to the Castle.
14. Faynights Castle.
15. An Interesting Day.
16. Secret Ways.
1897. Excitements and Shocks.
18. Jo Has an Adventure on Her Own.
219. Jo Joins In.
2P0. A Lot of Excitement.
221. In the Tower Room.
2 2. Jo and Beauty Have a Fine Time.
23, Having a Wonderful Time!
__________________
? List of illustrations
__________________


I

Five Have a Wonderful Time.

Chapter 1  George is All Alone

 

                        “I do think it’s mean,” said George, fier-

cely.  “Why can’t I go when the others do?  I’ve had two weeks

at home, and haven’t seen the others since school broke up.  And

now they’re off for a wonderful fortnight and I’m no yt with them’

                        “Don’t be silly, George,” said her mother.

“You can go as soon as that cold of yours is better.”

                        “It’s better now,” said George, scowling.

“Mothe tr, you know it is!”

                        “That’s enough, Georgina,” said her father,

looking up from his newspaper.  “This is the third breakfast-time

we’ve had this argument.  Be quiet.”

                        George would never answer anyone when she

was called Georgina – so, must as she would have liked to say

something back, she pursed up her mouth and looked away.

                        Her mother laughed.  “Oh George, dear!  Don’t

look so terribly fierce.  It was your ^ own fault fault you got this

cold – you would go and bathe and stay in far too long – and

after all, it’s only the third week in April!”

                        “I always bathe in April,” said George,

sulkily.

                        “I said “BE QUIET”, said her father, bang-

ing down his paper on the table.  “One more word from you, Ge rorge,

and you won’ ct go to your three cousins at all.


2

                        “Woof,” said Timmy, from the under the table.

He didn’t like it when anyone spoke angrily to George.

                        “And don’t you start arguing with me either,”

said George’s father, ^ poking Timmy with his toe, and scowling exactly like George.

                        His wife laughed again.  “Oh, be quiet, the

two of you,” she said.  “George, be patient dear.  I’ll let you

go off to your cousins as soon as ever I can – tomorrow, if

you’re good, and don’t cough much today.”

                        “Oh Mother – why didn’t you say so before?”

said George, her scowl disappearing like magic.   “I didn’t cough

once in the night.  I’m perfectly all/right today.  Oh, if I can

go off to Faynights Castle tomorrow, I promise I won’t cough

once today!”

                        “What’s this about Faynights Castle?” de-

manded her father, looking up again.  “First I’ve heard of it!”

                        “Oh no, Quentin dear, I’ve told you at least

three times,” said his wife.  “Julian, Dick and Anne have been

lent two funny old caravans by a school friend.   They are in

a field near Faynights Castle.”

                        “Oh.  So they’re not staying in a cast ele,

then,” said George’s father.  “Can’t have that.  I won’t have

George coming home all high and mighty.”

                        “George couldn’t possibly be high and

mighty,” said his wife.  “It’s as much as I can do to get her

to keep her nails clean and wear clean shorts.   Do be sen-


3

sible, Quentin.  You know perfectly well that George and her

cousins always like to go off on extraordinary holidays to-

gether.”

                        “And have adventures,” grinned George, who

was now in a very good temper indeed at the thought of going

to join her cousins the next day. x

                        “No.  You’re not to have any of those awful

adventures this time,” said her mother.  “Anyway, I don’t see how

you can, staying in a peaceful place like the village of Fay-

nigh gts Castle, living in a couple of old caravans.”

                        “I wouldn’t trust George anywhere,” said her

father husband.  “Give her just a sniff of an adventure, and she’s

after it.  I never knew anyone like George.  Thank goodness we’ve

only got one child.  I don’t feel as if I could cope with two

or three Georges.”

                        “There are plenty of people like George,”

said his wife.  “Julian and Dick, for instance.  Always in the

middle of something or other – with Anne tagging behind, longing

for a pea fceful life.”

                        “Well, I’ve had enough of this argument,”

said George’s father, pushing his chair out vigorously, and

accidentally kicking Timmy under the table.  He yelped.

                        “That dog’s got no brains,” said the impat-

inent man.  “Lies under the table at every meal and expects me to


Full title:
Manuscript note, typed copy of the same, and typescript pages of Five Go to Mystery Moor [NB the rest of this file, not shown here, constitutes a draft of The Circus of Adventure]; Typescript draft and rough title page of Five Have a Wonderful Time (Hodder & Stoughton, 1952)
Created:
c. 1952
Format:
Manuscript / Typescript / Draft
Language:
English
Creator:
Enid Blyton
Usage terms

Enid Blyton, Enid Blyton's signature and The Famous Five are registered trade marks of Hodder & Stoughton Limited. Text © Hodder & Stoughton Limited. You may not use the material for commercial purposes. Permission must be secured from the copyright holders to use or quote from this work.

Held by
Seven Stories
Shelfmark:
EB/01/01/01/01-03; EB/01/03/02

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