Photograph of stretcher bearers at work

Description

This photograph, taken by Charles Hilton DeWitt Girdwood, shows four stretcher bearers ‘at work’. They are attending to two men with head injuries, after what appears to be a recently concluded battle.

The Girdwood collection

In reality, however, this photograph only presents a sanitized image of the work endured by stretcher bearers. As ‘Geographer and Historical Photographer to the Government of India’, Girdwood was permitted to travel to France to create a visual record of the First World War, but on the condition that he remained away from the front lines.

Instead of showing the aftermath of an attack, this photograph depicts the Second Battalion of the Leicester Regiment under instruction to act ‘dead’ or wounded. The staging of this photograph is heightened by two soldiers swapping their BEF (British Expeditionary Force) uniforms for German ones.

‘The work’ of stretcher bearers

During World War One, a stretcher bearer’s role was the first link in the ‘chain of evacuation’ for wounded soldiers. With a basic knowledge of first aid – and relying upon physical strength – these men were tasked with retrieving the wounded from no man’s land, and transporting them over difficult ground to Regimental Aid Posts, Advanced Dressing Stations and, in some cases, to distant Casualty Clearing Stations. Evacuations were typically carried out under immense pressure because the bearers were working under streams of shell fire or battling through mud quagmires. It often took four to six men to move one casualty.

Full title:
Tenderly lifting a serious case; stretcher bearers at work. Photographer: Girdwood, Charles Hilton DeWitt
Created:
1915
Format:
Photograph / Image
Creator:
Charles Hilton DeWitt Girdwood
Copyright:
© Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen’s Printer for Scotland
Usage terms
Crown Copyright
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
Photo 21(151) 

Full catalogue details

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Article by:
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Themes:
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