Shopping for glassware at Messrs. Pellatt and Green's, 1809

Description

As manufacturing processes improved in the late 18th century, so economic prosperity rose. This brought about a surge in other manufactured luxury goods that appealed to high-class, moneyed tastes. Pictured here is Pellatt and Green’s glassware shop in St Paul’s Churchyard in the City of London in the early 19th century. Glassware, like luxury furniture, appealed to the refined tastes of the wealthy aristocratic and industrial elites, and was used to display prosperity both as practical tableware and as ornamental objects. British glasshouses specialising in lead-crystal dominated the global industry during the 18th century, particularly the glassworks of the industrial Black Country and West Midlands.

Full title:
Inside View of Messrs. Pellatt and Green's, St. Paul's Church Yard
Published:
1809, London
Format:
Print / Image
Creator:
Rudolph Ackermann
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
K.Top.27.23.

Full catalogue details

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