The Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer's Guide, 1789

Description

Though the age of manufacture might be thought of in terms of the great textile mills of northern cities during the industrial revolution, it was in London that most finished goods were produced in astonishing variety. London was the epicentre of a huge manufacturing industry, which grew during the late 18th century in response to demands for luxury items. Clocks and watches, cutlery, clothes, toys, metal wares, leather goods, glass, coaches, playing cards, guns and firearms, shoes and soap were among a whole range of goods manufactured for retail in the capital. In this page from The Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer’s Guide of 1789, note the dazzling array of items available.

Manufactured goods passed through many hands before completion, and subdivisions existed within even relatively unspecialised trades. Watch-making for example is thought to have employed 20 separate tradespeople each of whom specialised in just one intricate stage. Only the master watchmaker ever saw the finished article.

Full title:
The cabinet-maker and upholsterer's guide; or, Repository of designs for every article of household furniture ... From drawings by A. Heppelwhite and Co. cabinetmakers.
Published:
1789, London
Format:
Book
Creator:
Alice Hepplewhite and Co.
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
C.136.g.46.(1.)

Full catalogue details

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