The distribution of His Majesty's Maundy, by the Sub-Almoner in the Chapel Royal and Anti-Chapel

Description

Watercolours of the interior of the Chapel Royal with George III and Charlotte watching from the royal box as the poor line up to receive charity. These views were bequeathed to King George III in 1810 by Sir Richard Kaye, who commissioned Sameul Hieronymus Grimm to paint the scenes. Kaye is depicted distributing the money bags in the watercolours. 

Now held in the King's Topographical Collection, the watercolours had been exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1774 and are considered to be ‘undoubtedly Grimm’s most important historical work’ (see Rotha M. Clay, Samuel Hieronymus Grimm of Burgdorf in Switzerland (London: Faber & Faber, 1941), pp.56-8).

It would seem that in the late 1770s George III expressed an interest owning these watercolours to Grimm, who was then working in Windsor.   It was only many years later, however, in 1810, that their owner Sir Richard Kaye, the King’s Sub Almoner, who had commissioned the paintings, actually bequeathed them to the King unless, in the words of Kaye’s will ‘Mr Barnard [the royal Librarian] should imagine Mr. Grimm has misapprehended his [i.e. the King’s] words’.

Full title:
[THE DISTRIBUTION OF HIS MAJESTY'S MAUNDY, BY THE SUB-ALMONER in the Chapel Royal, at WHITEHALL] and [THE DISTRIBUTION OF HIS MAJESTY'S MAUNDY, BY THE SUB-ALMONER in the Anti-Chapel, at WHITEHALL]
Created:
1773
Format:
Pen and ink / Watercolour / View
Creator:
Grimm Samuel Hieronymus
Copyright:
© British Library
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
Maps K.Top.26.5.r. and Maps K.Top.26.5.t.

Full catalogue details

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What is K.Top?

Article by:
Felicity Myrone
Themes:
Transforming topography, Antiquarianism

George III's extensive collection of maps and views is known as the King's Topographical Collection or 'K.Top' for short. Felicity Myrone explores the history and extent of this rich collection, encompassing up to 40,000 items.