The Gough map

Description

The Gough Map of the British Isles, acquired by Richard Gough in 1774 from the collections of the antiquarian Thomas Martin, is justly famous as one of the earliest maps to depict Britain as a geographically recognisable island. Gough himself wrote that it is ‘in a style superior to any of the maps already described’. Drawn on vellum and demarcating over 600 place-names, it is the focus of a detailed and highly interesting research project.

Full title:
Gough Map of the British Isles, c. 1400, ink on vellum, Bodleian Library
Created:
1370s-late 15th century, unknown
Format:
Map / Parchment / Watercolour / Pen and ink
Creator:
anonymous
Copyright:
© Bodleian Library, University of Oxford
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
Bodleian Library, University of Oxford
Shelfmark:
MS. Gough Gen. Top. 16

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