The Lottery, by William Hogarth

Description

The Lottery, by William Hogarth (1697–1764), is an engraved satire denouncing the greed, folly and disillusion of those who took part in state-sponsored lotteries in the hope of making a quick and easy fortune.

The print was first published in 1724, around three years after its sister engraving The South Sea Scheme  appeared. Both prints use familiar London landmarks and classical allegories to satirise the evils of financial speculation. The Lottery is set in the Great Hall at the Guildhall, where state lotteries were traditionally drawn with much pomp and ceremony.

Full title:
The Lottery
Created:
1724
Format:
Print / Etching / Engraving
Creator:
William Hogarth
Copyright:
© Trustees of the British Museum
Usage terms
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike licence
Held by
The British Museum
Shelfmark:
18,560,614.29

Related articles

William Hogarth’s 'The South Sea Scheme' and the topography of speculative finance

Article by:
Clare Walcot
Themes:
Transforming topography, Town and city

Clare Walcot explores the significance of the London landmarks depicted by William Hogarth in his printed satires on speculative finance

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