De Lisle Psalter

Description

Taken from the De Lisle Psalter, this illustration tells the moral story The Three Living and the Three Dead in which three figures, often aristocratic and flaunting their vitality, meet three corpses who warn them about the inevitability of death. The numerous variations of this story and their accompanying illustrations provide a stark contrast between the beauty of the living and the worm-eaten corpses of the deceased. Moral messages about the importance of living a virtuous life on Earth are typical amongst Psalters and Book of Hours.

View images of the entire manuscript via our Digitised Manuscripts website.

Full title:
Psalter (the 'De Lisle Psalter')
Created:
c. 1308–40, England
Format:
Manuscript
Language:
Latin
Usage terms

Public Domain in most countries other than the UK. Please consider cultural, religious & ethical sensitivities when re-using this material.

Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
Arundel MS 83

Full catalogue details

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