The Women’s Battalion of Death

Description

An uneducated peasant woman from Siberia, Maria Bochkareva received a special dispensation to join the active army in 1914. She won military honours for her courage on the front line, and later became a stalwart supporter of the Provisional Government.

In 1917 Kerensky authorised her to establish a ‘women’s battalion of death’, made up of some 2,000 patriotic women volunteers. Although the battalion did see frontline service, its primary function was to shame non-combatant men into serving in the army.

Bochkareva was executed by the Bolsheviks in 1920.

Full title:
Yashka: My Life as Peasant, Officer and Exile. By M. Bochkareva. As set down by Isaac Don Levine
Published:
1919
Publisher:  
London: Constable & Company
Created:
1919
Format:
Book
Language:
English
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
010795.aaa.10.

Full catalogue details

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